• Wyoming Wrongful Death Laws

    If you die in the state of Wyoming, you are said to have died intestacy. Your assets will be divided through your family under Wyoming intestate succession laws. What your spouse receives depends on whether you have children, grandchildren, or great-grandchildren.

    Read the following to understand intestacy laws in Wyoming:

    • If the deceased leaves behind children but no spouse, the children will inherit everything.
    • If the deceased leaves behind a spouse but no descendants, the spouse will inherit everything.
    • If the deceased leaves behind a spouse and descendants, the spouse will inherit 1/2 of the intestate property and the descendants will inherit the remaining 1/2 of intestate property.
    • If the deceased leaves behind parents and siblings, but no spouse or descendants, the parents and siblings will inherit the intestate property in equal shares.

    To learn more about intestacy laws, visit www.nolo.com.

    If you or someone you know has lost a loved one without a will, contact the lawyers at Meyerson and O’Neill law firm for assistance today at 877-373-8059.

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  • Arkansas Wrongful Death Laws

    If you die in the state of Arkansas without a will, you are said to have passed away intestate. Your assets are divided among your closest relatives according to intestate succession laws. In Arkansas, regardless of whether or not you have a will when you die, your spouse will inherit property from you under a doctrine called “dower and courtesy.” This determines how much a spouse inherits based on how long they were married and whether or not they have descendants.

    Read the following to understand intestacy laws in Arkansas:

    • If the deceased left behind children or other descendants, they will inherit all of the intestate property. A spouse has the right to use 1/3 of the property for life, but the children inherit the property.
    • If the deceased left behind a spouse of at least three years and no children, the spouse will inherit all of the intestate property.
    • If the deceased left behind a spouse of less than three years and no children, the spouse will inherit 1/2 of intestate property, and parents, siblings, or other relatives can inherit the remaining 1/2 of intestate property.
    • If the deceased left behind parents but no children or spouse, the parents will inherit everything.
    • If the deceased left behind siblings but no children, spouse, or parents, the siblings will inherit everything.

    To learn more about intestacy laws, visit www.nolo.com.

    If you or someone you know has lost a loved one without a will, contact the lawyers at Meyerson and O’Neill law firm today at 877-373-8059.

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  • Kentucky Wrongful Death Laws

    If you die in the state of Kentucky without a will, you are said to have passed away intestate. Kentucky intestate succession laws are in place to divide your assets among your closest living family members. This only includes assets that would have passed through your will otherwise and are in your name only.

    Read the following to understand intestacy laws in Kentucky:

    • If the deceased left behind children but no spouse, the children will inherit 1/2 of the intestate property.
    • If the deceased left behind a spouse and descendants, the spouse will inherit 1/2 of the intestate property and the descendants will inherit the other 1/2 of property.
    • If the deceased left behind a spouse and parents but no descendants, the spouse inherits 1/2 of the intestate property and the parents inherit the rest of the property.
    • If the deceased left behind a spouse, siblings, but no parents or descendants, the spouse will inherit 1/2 of the intestate property and the siblings will inherit the other 1/2 of property divided equally if there is more than one sibling.
    • If the deceased left behind parents but no spouse or siblings, the parents will inherit everything.
    • If the deceased left behind siblings but no spouse, descendants, or parents, the siblings will inherit everything.

    To learn more about intestacy laws, visit www.nolo.com.

    If you or someone you know has lost a loved one without a will, contact the lawyers at Meyerson and O’Neill law firm today at 877-373-8059.

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  • South Dakota Wrongful Death Laws

    If you die in the state of South Dakota without a will, you have died intestate. Your assets will be divided among your closest relatives according to South Dakota intestate succession laws. What your spouse receives depends on whether you have children, grandchildren, parents, or other close relatives.

    Read the following to understand intestacy laws in South Dakota:

    • If the deceased leaves behind children but no spouse, the children will inherit everything.
    • If the deceased leaves behind a spouse but no descendants, the spouse will inherit everything.
    • If the deceased leaves behind a spouse and descendants from the deceased and the spouse, the spouse will inherit everything.
    • If the deceased leaves behind a spouse and at least one descendant from the deceased someone other than the spouse, the spouse will inherit $100,000 of intestate property and 1/2 of the balance. The descendants will inherit everything else divided equally.
    • If the deceased leaves behind parents but no spouse or descendants, the parents will inherit everything.
    • If the deceased leaves behind siblings but no spouse, descendants, or parents, the siblings will inherit everything.

    To learn more about intestacy laws, visit www.nolo.com.

    If you or someone you know has lost a loved one without a will, contact the lawyers at Meyerson and O’Neill law firm today at 877-373-8059.

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  • Alaska Wrongful Death Laws

    If you die in the state of Alaska without a will, you have died intestate. Your assets will be divided among your closest living relatives under Alaska intestate succession laws. What your spouse receives depends on whether you have living parents, children, grandchildren, or great grandchildren.

    Read the following to understand intestacy laws in Alaska:

    • If the deceased leave behind children but no spouse, parents, or siblings, the children will inherit everything in equal shares.
    • If the deceased leave behind a spouse, but no descendants or parents, the spouse will inherit everything.
    • If the deceased leave behind parents but no spouse, children, or siblings, the parents will inherit everything.
    • If the deceased leave behind siblings but no spouse, children, or parents, the siblings will inherit everything.
    • If the deceased leave behind a spouse and descendants from the deceased and the spouse, and the spouse has no other descendants, the spouse will inherit everything.
    • If the deceased leave behind a spouse and descendants from the deceased and the spouse, and the spouse has descendants from another relationship, the spouse will inherit $150,000 of the intestate property plus 1/2 of the balance. The descendants of the deceased will inherit everything else.
    • If the deceased leave behind a spouse and descendants from the deceased and someone other than the spouse, the spouse inherits the first $100,000 of the intestate property and 1/2 of the balance. The descendants will inherit everything else.
    • If the deceased leave behind a spouse and parents, the spouse inherits the first $200,000 of the intestate estate and 3/4 of the balance. The parents will inherit everything else.

    To learn more about intestacy laws, visit www.nolo.com.

    If you or someone you know has lost a loved one without a will, contact the lawyers at Meyerson and O’Neill law firm to assist you today at 877-373-8059.

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  • Arizona Wrongful Death Laws

    If you die in the state of Arizona without a will, you are said to have died intestate. Arizona intestate succession laws will divide your assets among your closest relatives. For children to inherit from you under intestacy, the state of Utah must consider them your children legally. For some families, this can be a confusing issue.

    Read the following to understand intestacy laws in Arizona:

    • If the deceased leaves behind children but no spouse, the children will inherit everything.
    • If the deceased leaves behind a spouse but no descendants, the spouse will inherit everything.
    • If the deceased leaves behind a spouse and descendants from the deceased and the spouse, the spouse will inherit everything.
    • If the deceased leaves behind a spouse and descendants from someone other than the spouse, the spouse will inherit 1/2 of the separate property but no interest in the 1/2 of the community property belonging to the deceased. Children will inherit 1/2 of the community property and 1/2 of the separate property.
    • If the deceased left behind parents but no spouse or descendants, the parents will inherit everything.
    • If the deceased left behind siblings but no spouse, descendants, or parents, the siblings will inherit everything.

    To learn more about intestacy laws, visit www.nolo.com.

    If you or someone you know has lost a loved one without a will, contact the lawyers at Meyerson and O’Neill law firm to help you through this process today at 877-373-8059.

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  • Utah Wrongful Death Laws

    If you die in the state of Utah without a will, you are said to have died intestate. Your assets will be divided among your closest relatives according to intestate succession laws. Only assets that would have passed through your will go through intestate succession laws. What your spouse receives depends on whether you have children, grandchildren, or great-grandchildren.

    Read the following to understand intestacy laws in Utah:

    • If the deceased leave behind children but no spouse, the children will inherit everything.
    • If the deceased leave behind a spouse and no descendants, the spouse will inherit everything.
    • If the deceased leave behind a spouse and descendants from the deceased and spouse, the spouse will inherit everything.
    • If the deceased leave behind a spouse and descendants from the deceased and someone other than the spouse, the spouse will inherit the first $75,000 of the intestate property plus 1/2 of the balance. The descendants will inherit everything else.
    • If the deceased leave behind parents but no spouse or descendants, the parents will inherit everything.
    • If the deceased leave behind siblings but no spouse, descendants, or parents, the siblings will inherit everything.

    To learn more about intestacy laws, visit www.nolo.com.

    If you or someone you know has lost a loved one without a will, contact the lawyers at Meyerson and O’Neill law firm today at 877-373-8059.

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  • Nevada Wrongful Death Laws

    If you die in the state of Nevada without a will, you are said to have passed away intestacy. Your personal assets will be divided among your family according to intestate succession laws. What your spouse receives depends on how the two of you owned the property, as separate or community property. Community property is acquired while the couple was married, and separate property is acquired before marriage. Gifts and inheritances given solely to the deceased are separate property, even if acquired during marriage.

    Read the following to understand intestacy laws in Nevada:

    • If the deceased leave behind children but no spouse, parents, or siblings, the children will inherit the intestate property in equal shares.
    • If the deceased leave behind a spouse but no children, parents, or siblings, the spouse will inherit everything.
    • If the deceased leave behind parents but no children, spouse, or siblings, the parents will inherit everything.
    • If the deceased leave behind siblings but no children, spouse, or parents, the siblings will inherit everything in equal shares.
    • If the deceased leave behind a spouse and children, the spouse will inherit all of the community property and 1/2 or 1/3 of the separate property. The children will inherit 1/2 or 2/3 of the separate property.
    • If the deceased leave behind a spouse and parents, the spouse will inherit all of the community property and 1/2 of the separate property. The parents will inherit 1/2 of the separate property.
    • If the deceased leave behind a spouse and siblings but no parents, the spouse will inherit all of the community property and 1/2 of the separate property. The siblings will inherit the other 1/2 of the separate property.

    To learn more about intestacy laws in Nevada, visit www.nolo.com.

    If you or someone you know has lost a loved one without a will, contact the lawyers at Meyerson and O’Neill law firm today at 877-373-8059.

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  • Oregon Wrongful Death Laws

    If you die in the state of Oregon without a will, you have passed away intestate. Oregon intestate succession laws are in place to distribute your assets among your closest living relatives. These assets are ones that are in your name only and do not include a beneficiary.

    Read the following to understand intestacy laws in Oregon:

    • If the deceased leaves behind children but no spouse, the children will inherit everything.
    • If the deceased leaves behind a spouse but no descendants or parents, the spouse will inherit everything.
    • If the deceased leaves behind a spouse and descendants of both, the spouse will inherit everything.
    • If the deceased leaves behind a spouse and at least one descendant from the deceased and someone other than the spouse, the spouse will inherit 1/2 of the intestate property and the descendants will inherit the remainder.
    • If the deceased leaves behind parents but no spouse or descendants, the parents will inherit everything.
    • If the deceased leaves behind siblings but no spouse, descendants, or parents, the siblings will inherit everything.

    To learn more about intestacy laws, visit www.nolo.com.

    If you or someone you know has lost a loved one without a will, contact the lawyers at Meyerson and O’Neill law firm today at 877-373-8059.

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  • Michigan Wrongful Death Laws

    If you die in the state of Michigan without a will, you are said to have passed away intestate. Your assets will fall under Michigan intestate succession laws and will be divided among your closest living relatives.

    Read the following to understand intestacy laws in Michigan:

    • If the deceased left behind children but no spouse, the children will inherit everything.
    • If the deceased left behind a spouse but no descendants or parents, the spouse will inherit everything.
    • If the deceased left behind a spouse and descendants from the deceased and spouse, the spouse inherits $150,000 of the intestate property, plus 1/2 the balance, and the descendants inherit the remainder.
    • If the deceased left behind a spouse and at least one descendant from the deceased and the spouse, and at least one descendant from another relationship, the spouse inherits the first $150,000 of the intestate property and 1/2 of the balance, and the descendants inherit everything else.
    • If the deceased left behind a spouse, no descendants from the deceased and the spouse, and at least one descendant from another relationship, the spouse inherits $100,000 of the intestate property and 1/2 of the balance. The descendants inherit everything else.
    • If the deceased left behind a spouse and parents, the spouse inherits the first $150,000 of the intestate property and 3/4 of the balance. The parents inherit the remainder.
    • If the deceased left behind parents but no spouse or descendants, the parents inherit everything.
    • If the deceased left behind siblings but no spouse, descendants, or parents, the siblings inherit everything.

    To learn more about intestacy laws, visit www.nolo.com.

    If you or someone you know has lost a loved one without a will, contact the lawyers at Meyerson and O’Neill law firm today at 877-373-8059.

    continue reading