• Colorado Wrongful Death Laws

    If you die in the state of Colorado without a will, you have passed away intestacy. Your assets will be divided among your closest relatives according to Colorado intestate succession laws.

    Read the following to understand intestacy laws in Colorado:

    • If the deceased left behind children but no spouse, the children will inherit everything.
    • If the deceased left behind a spouse but no descendants, the spouse will inherit everything.
    • If the deceased left behind a spouse and descendants from the deceased and the spouse, and the spouse has no other descendants, the spouse will inherit everything.
    • If the deceased left behind a spouse and descendants from the deceased and the spouse, and the spouse has descendants from another relationship, the spouse will inherit $150,000 of the intestate property and 1/2 of the balance. The descendants will inherit the remainder.
    • If the deceased left behind a spouse and adult descendants from the deceased and someone other than the spouse, the spouse inherits the first $100,000 of the intestate property and 1/2 of the balance. The descendants inherit the remainder.
    • If the deceased left behind a spouse and at least one minor descendant from the deceased and someone other than the spouse, the spouse will inherit 1/2 of the intestate property and the descendants inherit the remainder.
    • If the deceased left behind a spouse and parents, the spouse will inherit the first $200,000 of the intestate property and 3/4 of the balance. The parents will inherit the remaining intestate property.
    • If the deceased left behind parents but no spouse or descendants, the parents will inherit everything.
    • If the deceased left behind siblings but no spouse, descendants, or parents, the siblings will inherit everything.

    To learn more about intestacy laws, visit www.nolo.com.

    If you or someone you know has lost a loved one without a will, contact the lawyers at Meyerson and O’Neill law firm today at 877-373-8059.

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  • Wisconsin Wrongful Death Laws

    If you die in the state of Wisconsin without a will, you have passed away intestacy. Wisconsin intestate succession laws are in place to divide your assets among your closest surviving family members. These laws try to keep your assets out of the state and within the closest family members possible.

    Read the following to understand intestacy laws in Wisconsin:

    • If the deceased leaves behind children but no spouse, the children inherit everything.
    • If the deceased leaves behind a spouse but no descendants, the spouse will inherit everything.
    • If the deceased leaves behind a spouse and descendants from the deceased and the spouse, and the spouse has no other descendants, the spouse will inherit everything.
    • If the deceased leaves behind a spouse and descendants from the deceased and the spouse, and the spouse has other descendants from another relationship, the spouse will inherit 3/5 of the intestate property. The descendants will inherit 2/5 of the intestate property.
    • If the deceased leaves behind a spouse and descendants from the deceased and someone other than the spouse, the spouse will inherit 1/2 of the intestate property, and the descendants will inherit the other 1/2 of the intestate property.
    • If the deceased leaves behind parents but no spouse or descendants, the parents will inherit the entire intestate property.
    • If the deceased leaves behind siblings but no spouse, descendants, or parents, the siblings will inherit the entire intestate property.

    To learn more about intestacy laws, visit www.nolo.com.

    If you or someone you know has lost a loved one without a will, contact the lawyers at Meyerson and O’Neill law firm today at 877-353-8059.

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  • West Virginia Wrongful Death Laws

    If you die in the state of West Virginia without a will, you are said to have passed away intestacy. West Virginia Intestate Succession laws are in place to distribute your assets to the closest living family members.

    Read the following to understand intestacy laws in West Virginia:

    • If the deceased leaves behind children but no spouse, the children will inherit everything.
    • If the deceased leaves behind a spouse but no descendants, the spouse will inherit everything.
    • If the deceased leaves behind a spouse and descendants from the deceased and the spouse, and the spouse has no other descendants, the spouse will inherit everything.
    • If the deceased leaves behind a spouse and descendants, and the spouse has descendants from another relationship, the spouse inherits 3/5 of the intestate property. The descendants will inherit the other 2/5 of the intestate property.
    • If the deceased leaves behind a spouse and descendants from someone other than the spouse, the spouse inherits 1/2 of the intestate property and the descendants inherit the other 1/2 of the property.
    • If the deceased leaves behind parents but no spouse or descendants, the parents inherit the entire intestate property.
    • If the deceased leaves behind siblings but no spouse, descendants, or parents, the siblings will inherit the entire intestate property.

    To learn more about intestacy laws, visit www.nolo.com.

    If you or someone you know has lost a loved one without a will, contact the lawyers at Meyerson and O’Neill law firm today at 877-373-8059.

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  • Washington Wrongful Death Laws

    If you were to die in the state of Washington without a will, you are said to have passed away intestacy. State intestate succession laws are in place to distribute your assets among your closest family members.

    Read the following to understand intestacy laws in Washington:

    • If the deceased leaves behind children but no spouse, parents, or siblings, the children will inherit everything.
    • If the deceased leaves behind a spouse but no children, parents, or siblings, the spouse will inherit everything.
    • If the deceased leaves behind parents but no children, spouse or siblings, the parents will inherit everything.
    • If the deceased leaves behind siblings but no children, spouse, or parents, the siblings will inherit everything.
    • If the deceased leaves behind a spouse and children, the spouse inherits all of the community property and 1/2 of the separate property. The children inherit the other 1/2 of the separate property.
    • If the deceased leaves behind a spouse and parents, the spouse will inherit all of the community property and 3/4 of the separate property. The parents will inherit 1/4 of the separate property.
    • If the deceased leaves behind a spouse and siblings, but no parents, the spouse inherits all of the community property and 3/4 of the separate property. The siblings will inherit 1/4 of the separate property.

    To learn more about intestacy laws, visit www.nolo.com.

    If you or someone you know has lost a loved one without a will, contact the lawyers at Meyerson and O’Neill law firm today at 877-373-8059.

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  • North Dakota Wrongful Death Laws

    If you were to die in the state of North Dakota without a will in place, you are said to have passed away intestacy. North Dakota intestate succession laws divide up your assets to the closest living family members to avoid the risk of your assets going to the state.

    Read the following to understand intestacy laws in North Dakota:

    • If the deceased left behind children but no spouse, the children inherit the intestate property in equal shares.
    • If the deceased left behind a spouse but no descendants or parents, the spouse inherits everything.
    • If the deceased left behind a spouse and descendants from the deceased and spouse, and the spouse has no other descendants, the spouse inherits everything.
    • If the deceased left behind a spouse and descendants from the deceased and spouse, and the spouse has descendants from another relationship, the spouse inherits the first $225,000 of the intestate property and 1/2 of the separate property balance, and the descendants of the deceased inherit the remainder.
    • If the deceased left behind a spouse and descendants from another relationship, the spouse inherits the first $150,000 of the property and 1/2 the balance of the estate, and the descendants inherit the remainder.
    • If the deceased left behind a spouse and parents, the spouse inherits the first $300,000 of the intestate property and 3/4 of the balance. The parents inherit the remainder of the intestate property.
    • If the deceased left behind parents but no spouse or descendants, the parents inherit everything.
    • If the deceased left behind siblings but no spouse, descendants, or parents, the siblings inherit everything.

    To learn more about intestacy laws, visit www.nolo.com.

    If you or someone you know has lost a loved one without a will, contact the lawyers at Meyerson and O’Neill law firm today at 877-373-8059.

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  • Hawaii Wrongful Death Laws

    In the state of Hawaii, if you die without a will, you are said to have passed away intestacy. Intestate succession laws are in place to divide your assets among your closest living relatives. Valuable assets that do no go through your will otherwise are not part of intestate succession, only those that are in your name only.

    Read the following to understand intestacy laws in Hawaii:

    • If the deceased leaves behind children but no spouse, the children will inherit everything.
    • If the deceased leaves behind a spouse but no descendants or parents, the spouse will inherit everything.
    • If the deceased leaves behind a spouse and descendants from the deceased and spouse, and the spouse has no other descendants, the spouse inherits everything.
    • If the spouse and descendants from both the deceased and spouse are living, and the spouse has descendants from another relationship, the spouse will inherit $150,000 from the intestate property plus 1/2 of the balance. The descendants inherit the remainder of the intestate property.
    • If the spouse and descendants from the deceased and someone other than the spouse are still living, the spouse inherits $100,000 from the intestate property plus 1/2 of the separate property. The descendants inherit everything else.
    • If the spouse and parents are surviving, the spouse inherits $200,000 of the intestate property plus 3/4 of the balance; the parents inherit the remainder.
    • If the parents are surviving but no spouse or descendants, the parents inherit everything.
    • If the siblings are surviving but no spouse, descendants, or parents, the siblings inherit everything.

    To learn more about intestacy laws, visit www.nolo.com.

    If you or someone you know has lost a loved one without a will, contact the lawyers at Meyerson and O’Neill law firm today at 877-373-8059.

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  • Georgia Wrongful Death Laws

    If you die in the state of Georgia without a will, you are said to have passed intestacy. Intestate succession laws are in place to distribute the assets you own among your close relatives. These assets are ones that you own in your name only, with no named beneficiary.

    Read the following to understand intestacy laws in Georgia:

    • If the deceased leaves behind children but no spouse, the children inherit the everything.
    • If the deceased leaves behind a spouse but no descendants, the spouse inherits everything.
    • If the deceased leaves behind a spouse and descendants, the spouse and descendants equally share the property, but the spouse share cannot be less than 1/3 of the property.
    • If the deceased leaves behind parents but no spouse or descendants, the parents inherit everything, divided equally.
    • If the deceased leaves behind siblings but no spouse, descendants, or parents, the siblings inherit everything in equally shares.

    To learn more about intestacy laws, visit www.nolo.com.

    If you or someone you know has lost a loved one without a will, contact the lawyers at Meyerson and O’Neill law firm today at 877-37308059.

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  • Idaho Wrongful Death Laws

    If you die in the state of Idaho without a will, your assets will be divided among your relatives according to intestate succession laws. Only those assets that would have regularly passed through a will are assets that are distributed by intestate succession laws. Valuable assets such as retirement funds are passed to the surviving co-owner or beneficiary that you named.

    Read the following to understand intestacy laws in the state of Idaho:

    • If the deceased left behind surviving children but no spouse, the children inherit the entire property in equal shares.
    • If the deceased left behind a surviving spouse but no descendants or parents, the spouse inherits everything.
    • If the deceased left behind parents but no spouse or descendants, the parents inherit everything.
    • If the deceased left behind a spouse and descendants, the spouse inherits all of the community property and 1/2 of separate property. The children inherit the remaining 1/2 of separate property.
    • If the deceased left behind a spouse and parents, the spouse inherits all of the community property and 1/2 of the separate property and the parents inherit the remaining separate property.

    To learn more about intestate laws, visit www.nolo.com.

    If you or someone you has lost a loved one without a will, contact the experts at Meyerson and O’Neill law firm today at 877-373-8059.

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  • Oklahoma Wrongful Death Laws

    If you die in the state of Oklahoma without a will, you are said to have died intestacy. This means that it is up to the state to divide your assets among your relatives under intestate succession laws. Assets that are divided among family members are ones that are in your name only. Many valuable assets do not go through your will and are untouched by intestacy laws, such as 401(k)s, retirement plans, life insurance, or property you own with someone else.

    Read the following to understand intestacy laws in Oklahoma:

    • If the deceased leaves behind children but no spouse, the children will inherit everything and divide shares equally.
    • If the deceased leaves behind a spouse but no descendants, parents, or siblings, the spouse will inherit everything.
    • If the deceased leaves behind a spouse and descendants from that spouse, the spouse inherits 1/2 of the estate and the descendants inherit the rest.
    • If the deceased leaves behind a spouse and at least one descendant from someone other than that spouse, the spouse inherits 1/2 of the property acquired together and splits the remainders equally with the descendants. The descendants also inherit everything else.
    • If the deceased leaves behind a spouse and parents, the spouse inherits all of the property acquired together during marriage plus 1/3 of the remaining property, and the parents receive everything else.
    • If the deceased leaves behind a spouse and siblings, the spouse inherits all of the property acquired together during marriage plus 1/3 of the property, and the siblings inherit the remainder.
    • If the deceased leaves behind parents but no spouse or descendants, the parents inherit all of the property.
    • If the deceased leaves behind siblings but no spouse, descendants, or parents, the siblings inherit everything.

    To learn more about intestacy laws, visit www.nolo.com.

    If you or someone you know has lost a loved one without a will, contact the lawyers at Meyerson O’Neill law firm today at 877-373-8059.

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  • South Carolina Wrongful Death Laws

    If you die in the state of South Carolina without a will, you are said to have passed away intestacy. Your assets will go to your closest surviving relatives, in the order of intestate succession. Intestate succession laws are in place to keep the assets of the deceased in the family.

    Read the following to understand intestacy laws in South Carolina:

    • If the deceased leaves behind children with no spouse, the children will inherit everything.
    • If the deceased leaves behind a spouse but no descendants, the spouse will inherit everything.
    • If the deceased leaves behind a spouse and descendants, the spouse will inherit 1/2 of the intestate and the descendants will receive an equal share of the remainder.
    • If the deceased leaves behind parents but no spouse or descendants, the parents will inherit everything.
    • If the deceased leaves behind siblings but no spouse, descendants, or parents, the siblings will inherit everything.

    To learn more about intestacy laws, visit www.nolo.com.

    If you or someone you know has lost a loved one suddenly and without a will, contact the lawyers at Meyerson and O’Neill law firm today at 877-373-8059.

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